Saturday, April 01, 2017

#AtoZChallenge- Atomic Bombs





It is said, the Baby Boom started exactly 9 months after, the war ended. 

If ever there was a time, I was happy to have not been born yet, it would be August 6 and August 9, 1945. On these days, The United States dropped nuclear bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

On August 6, the U.S. dropped a uranium gun-type (Little Boy) bomb on Hiroshima, and American President Harry S. Truman called for Japan's surrender, warning it to "expect a rain of ruin from the air, the like of which has never been seen on this earth."

Three days later, on August 9, a plutonium implosion-type (Fat Man) bomb was dropped on Nagasaki.

Within the first two to four months of the bombings, the acute effects of the atomic bombings killed 90,000–146,000 people in Hiroshima and 39,000–80,000 in Nagasaki; roughly half of the deaths in each city occurred on the first day. During the following months, large numbers died from the effect of burns, radiation sickness, and other injuries, compounded by illness and malnutrition. In both cities, most of the dead were civilians, although Hiroshima had a sizable military garrison.

 Japan announced its surrender to the Allies on August 15, six days after the bombing of Nagasaki and the Soviet Union's declaration of war. On September 2, the Japanese government signed the instrument of surrender, effectively ending World War II.

The ethical justification for the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is still debated to this day, mainly because more than a hundred thousand civilians were killed.

As children, we learned about this in school. I'll never forget, watching that infamous, mushroom cloud on the school's movie projector in the classroom. I remember going home, and asking my mom all about it. She told me it had to be done because the Japanese wouldn't surrender due to their strict Shinto code. My Mom was 11 years old, and that is how she was to accept it. I don't know, but I find it interesting, how those atomic bombs ended World War 2  and ushered in the Baby Boom Generation and the Cold War.

1946

SPORTS: World Series:St. Louis over Boston, 4-3
Joe Louis defends heavyweight title for 23rd time
“Assault” wins Belmont, Preakness and Kentucky Derby

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: 
Movies: The Best Years of Our Lives,
Notorious,
Great Expectations

Songs: Tenderly,
Come Rain or Come Shine,
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah

TV Shows:
Gillette Cavalcade of Sports,
Esso Newsreel (programming limited to approximately 12 hours per week on two networks)

Books: Hiroshima, John Hersey;
Baby and Child Care, Dr. Benjamin Spock;
All the King’s Men, Robert Penn Warren


sources; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki
http://blog.nuclearsecrecy.com/2015/08/03/were-there-alternatives-to-the-atomic-bombings/
https://www.osti.gov/opennet/manhattan-project-history/Events/1945/hiroshima.htm

73 comments:

  1. I wonder what would have happened if we hadn't dropped the bombs?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The war would of continued - more lives lost. But we had developed the bomb and I do think we would of eventually had to use it.

      Delete
  2. War is a terrible thing. Nuclear option is not a good thing for any of us. They have the possibility of destroying us all which is chilling. No wonder we have so many dystopian novels. I don't think they knew how bad those bombs were until they were dropped.
    Hey, It's Ann visiting from A to Z So Much to Choose From and
    Science Ladybug

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ann. You are right.

      Delete
  3. The further away from the time, the more it seems unnecessary. I'm sure we could have ended the war without such a crushing blow, at the loss of many more of our soldiers. 20-30 years later there were still Japanese soldiers holed up in caves that didn't surrender and didn't know the war was over. We probably could have demonstrated the power of the weapon without dropping it in cities and convinced Japan to surrender, not sure it is fair to judge. My father worked in the States on a special government project during the war. That is all he ever said about it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, isn't that interesting, how they found these old Japanese soldiers years after. Poor guys, missed all their life. They were loyal, though.

      Delete
  4. I get shivers whenever I think about those bombs and what it must have been like for the innocents to experience such a horrific thing. Great first post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fortunately, we haven't seen those horrors during our lifetime and hopefully we never will.

      Delete
  5. Hindsight is SO 20/20. I can hardly imagine making the decision to rain down ruin on an entire people, and even harder to fathom is how this was all communicated in the days before the internet. Guess they didn't "get" to be second-guessed at every word, sentence, and paragraph.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes it is. We tend to do a lot of that, these days. President Truman wasn't a weenie, that's for sure.

      Delete
  6. What an interesting theme! Baby Boomer here (1957). I not only remember learning about this is school but heard stories from my relatives. Hopefully we never see something like this!

    Cheryl
    Plucking Of My Heartstrings

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cheryl. I'm with you there - I hope it never happens again. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  7. Thank you for this great post. I have you on my roll and I'm psyched about reading the 25 posts this month. I see you have two other blogs! I've added those to my roll as well. I love this challenge because I get to add interesting ideas and thoughts from all over. Thank you for dropping in on my blog. Happy AtoZ!

    Susan
    FREEZERBURNED

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Susan. I remember your blog. I bookmarked your blog.

      Delete
  8. Very scary time of history. Not sure whether our time is better, or even more scary. Good post.

    Dena
    https://denapawling.blogspot.com/2017/04/a-is-for-arizona.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I believe each generation faces their "time" when horrific decisions have to be made.

      Delete
  9. sobering thoughts... and interesting how those contrast with the popular song of the year, Zip-a-dee-doo-dah.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahhhh you noticed that!!!! :-)

      We had to make ourselves feel good, somehow....

      Delete
  10. I watched a documentary years ago about the bombs. They interviewed several Japanese soldiers who all said they should not have surrendered even with the bombs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes it was that shinto code they were brainwashed in. Sad.

      Delete
  11. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I can't even imagine living through that. I remember the horror of Sept 11 and watching the buildings fall, and crying knowing how many people would have died. Would I feel different if it wasn't Americans? I'm sure it would be different, but thinking about how many people died because of those two bombs is just devastating. But thinking about how many more Americans, and allies, and Jews would have died if the war would have continued...
    Thanks for the blog visit today :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for stopping by.

      Delete
  13. Let's hope that such horrific weapons are never used again.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Great post, hindsight for sure, but I do like the idea of simply showing what it could do first. So many innocents die in war and who really benefits?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. General Sherman said, "War is hell." It sure is.

      Delete
  15. My uncle saw it afterwards. The bombing on Pearl Harbor felt like a civilian attack to tje nation as we were not yet directly involved and the soldiers were on their own soil.
    Perspectives at Life & Faith in Caneyhead

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pearl Harbor was a heartbreaker for the nation and from all that I have read, a good part of the attack could of been prevented. Intelligence at the time, was warning that an attack was imminent but as always, politics wouldn't listen

      Delete
  16. It was part of everyday life. Look at the film that won best picture, The Best Years of Our Lives, it is about how soldiers have to adapt to normal life after being in WWII. Even though the bombs were dropped in an instant, it changed our lives forever.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Totally. Thanks for visiting Adam

      Delete
  17. Interesting post. I don't want this to ever have to happen again, but I also feel like we have to somehow understand how the world got to this point, right? I think we are going through our own time right now. I think you are right that every generation goes through their own crisis, and moment when they need to look and make a decision on what is necessary for the world to be a better place.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I wasn't around for the bomb, but this still makes me long for the days of my youth as crazy as they were. And actually, I'm not sure they were any crazier than today. I just have a different perspective. Nicely done, thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The older I get, I appreciate the memories of my youth, too

      Delete
  19. Years ago when we lived in Santa Fe, New Mexico, we visited Los Alamos, New Mexico. That's the place they set up to make the bomb. It was so secret at the time not anyone really knew the "town" existed much less what was happening there. They have a museum with lots of facts about the bomb, etc. It was a necessary "evil" that caused havoc for Japan and the lives of many gone or altered. War, again sadly, is like that.

    Good start to A/Z!

    betty

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd love to visit that.

      Delete
  20. My introduction to the atomic bomb was at school. Our teacher told us about it in history lessons... then read to us "The Great Sun of Hiroshima". I think that made a great impression on me. I've always had a sense that that was one of the worst things people did to other people. And reading the Presiden't declaration now really gives me the chills.
    But then, of course people back then didn't know what we know now.

    This is a great stat to your challenge. I love history, so I'll be back ;-)

    @JazzFeathers
    The Old Shelter - 1940s Film Noir

    ReplyDelete
  21. It is ironical that peace comes with a price of huge violence. But did we really got world peace?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, but something had to be done.

      Delete
  22. While you have started a challenge looking at a world event, I started with looking inside.
    http://charandeepsblog.blogspot.in/2017/04/a-away.html?m=1

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I read it and commented. Enjoyed it.

      Delete
  23. I was born in 1963 and a baby boomer. I only admitted it when Alex Trebek's TV commercial for the Penn Life forced me too tho. :) Then of course this meant that my children would be raised in Generation Rx. All joking aside your post was very interesting. Thanks for stopping by my blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahhh a baby-baby boomer.

      Delete
  24. It was a very sad way to put an end to a terrible war and I jump back and forth on the fence of necessity. Mainly from what I have read, the Japanese culture made it cowardice to give up. Without the bomb, the Allies (mainly the US) would have had to invade mainland Japan to end the war and the loss of lives on both sides would have been large and the loss of even more cities in Japan. I guess we'll never know.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm with you, it was a sad way to end the war but a decision that was not taken lightly, I am sure.

      Delete
  25. You have started the challenge with a bang. I hope you continue to have a blast!
    Thanks for visiting Sue's Trifles

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha ha. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  26. That looks very scary. Uncle James was alive in 1945 but Mummy wasn't. Thank you for visiting my blog.
    Happy AtoZ!
    Kevin at George's Guinea Pig World

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  27. My mom is German and survived the bombings of Hamburg and Dresden. She was 17 when she was in Dresden on a school trip and remembered all the people who left the big cities to go to the Venice on the Elbe. Way over. 100,000 died from that one night of bombing and probably more because so many people went to this city convinced it would never be bombed. My mom escaped to the outskirts and watched it being bombed in formation. The Atomic bomb was horrible and brought in the Cold War and the fear of these bombs but any bombing is horrible on the innocents below

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, you should record her stories. People are very interested in first hand personal recollections.

      Delete
  28. I really can't imagine living in such a time. Interesting theme!

    -Dorky Mom Doodles

    ReplyDelete
  29. I hope you might enjoy this.
    https://troyklynch.wordpress.com/2016/09/03/70s-b-themes/?preview=true

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, and yes I am reading it. Great minds think alike.

      Delete
  30. Greetings from a fellow Baby Boomer. ☺ Your theme is of great interest and you certainly started off full force. What a horrible time in history! How sad that the innocent masses must always suffer. Looking forward to more.
    Debbie @ THE DOGLADY'S DEN
    LATEST POST: AZZURRO: Going AWOL in Swiitzerland

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There were the good times, too. Thanks for the visit.

      Delete
  31. Yeah such a terrible time, we are all sadden by the bombing of Japan back then but I guess at the time it seemed the only way to end the war

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is true -I figure they knew better than we do today

      Delete
  32. Whoa. A is awful, all right.
    Thanks for stopping by!
    Shoes A-Z: http://repeatsamb.blogspot.com/p/a-z-fluevogs.html
    Trucks A-Z: https://annembray.wordpress.com/a-to-z-challenge-2017/

    ReplyDelete
  33. Oh wow, well I was born in 1983 so I wasn't around for any of that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yep, this was a long time ago.

      Delete
  34. Wars are bad. They affect so many innocent lives & sometimes the impact lies for ages

    ReplyDelete
  35. I, too, am a Baby Boomer. What I remember of the Cold War were the magazines that interspersed jello recipes with bomb shelter plans. Then the whole thing was overshadowed by Vietnam. Thank goodness for the Beatles!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting times we lived in back then. Thanks for visiting

      Delete
  36. Would the US have won the war without the bomb? Without a doubt. Their war machine dwarfed Japan's, eventually they would have beaten them into submission. Would it have a cost more lives by prolonging the conflict with conventional warfare? Maybe, but 200,000 people dead in two days is a staggering amount, though notably it cost far few American lives this way. And the US was certainly was never above a massive display of firepower just to show they could do it (see also: Firebombing of Dresden).

    Hiroshima and Nagasaki were more than anything not just a way to shock Japan into surrender, but an announcement to the whole world that the US was rising to a global world superpower. They didn't want to just prove they could defeat Japan, they wanted to prove they could defeat anyone. Unfortunately Russia rose to that challenge, and we're still feeling the fall-out from that today.

    B is for Battle of Beaumont Hamel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You nailed it. I totally agree

      Delete
  37. I hope we never see such sad destruction again in my lifetime. So sad! But at the time they did what they thought was necessary!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well we may not be seeing atomic bombs, but there still is destruction and holocausts going on presently. Syria and all the children and people succumbing to chemical weaponry. Humanity will never learn

      Delete

Comments are good - I admit, sometimes I don't respond back, in time for a dialog. I bad! I will TRY and do better. Thanks for understanding.

Popular Posts